FIELDCLUB

2004 - 2012
In collaboration with Kenna Hernly

An experimental 4 acre smallholding in the Southwest of the UK interrogating the premise of subsistence farming and off-grid living in a post-industrial society.

We implemented a model of food production based on a theoretical equal division of available agricultural land between the current UK population using the FieldMachine software (see 'Hypothetical Reterritorialisations').

The project takes a realist approach towards problematic complexities concealed within some environmental ideologies, and illustrate the principles of 'dark ecology'.

The FIELDCLUB project generated a substantial body of research, and has been the catalyst for numerous art works.

For more information and FIELDCLUB works please visit: FIELDCLUB Website

One For Sorrow, Digital Video 2008: Re-enactment of the last flight of a magpie found drowned in a water butt, before its subsequent burial in the FIELDCLUB Graveyard.
One For Sorrow, Digital Video 2008: Re-enactment of the last flight of a magpie found drowned in a water butt, before its subsequent burial in the FIELDCLUB Graveyard.

Vole No Pulse, 2007: Short video film documenting the accidental death by lawnmower, and subsequent burial, of a pregnant field vole in the FIELDCLUB Graveyard.
Vole No Pulse, 2007: Short video film documenting the accidental death by lawnmower, and subsequent burial, of a pregnant field vole in the FIELDCLUB Graveyard.

Slug'o'metric Device I, 2007: The first in a series of kinetic sculptures that employ progressively more complex technologies to perform the same task - the machines exact, and simultaneously quantify, slug death in the gardens at FIELDCLUB. As each device becomes more accomplished in its use of diverse technologies, the user becomes further removed from the effective action of the device.
Slug'o'metric Device I, 2007: The first in a series of kinetic sculptures that employ progressively more complex technologies to perform the same task - the machines exact, and simultaneously quantify, slug death in the gardens at FIELDCLUB. As each device becomes more accomplished in its use of diverse technologies, the user becomes further removed from the effective action of the device.

Slug'o'metric Device II, 2008.
Slug'o'metric Device II, 2008.

Slug'o'metric Device III, 2009.
Slug'o'metric Device III, 2009.

Slug'o'metric Device III (Radio remote), 2009.
Slug'o'metric Device III (Radio remote), 2009.

CRAPUCOPIA 2010: An assortment of failed crops grown at the FIELDCLUB site and immortalised in cast resin. Including: diminutive red cabbage and garlic, swede severely affected by carrot fly, unpollinated sweetcorn, and parsnip necrotised by canker. Arranged in a shape derived from a traditional cornucopia.
CRAPUCOPIA 2010: An assortment of failed crops grown at the FIELDCLUB site and immortalised in cast resin. Including: diminutive red cabbage and garlic, swede severely affected by carrot fly, unpollinated sweetcorn, and parsnip necrotised by canker. Arranged in a shape derived from a traditional cornucopia.

24hr FIELDCLUB Wildlife Museum - still from time-lapse series, 2006: 
This is not a museum displaying evidence of wildlife for the benefit of the human, but a museum displaying evidence of the human for the benefit of wildlife. 
This growing collection of dated and verified archeological artefacts were found during farming activities at FIELDCLUB. The collection is displayed 24/7 on-site, at the mercy of the elements, in an assortment of salvaged wine-chiller cabinets. The cabinets' 12volt LED lighting is activated automatically at night and recharged by solar power by day - allowing passing wildlife to view the displays at any time. A timelapse camera is occasionally set up to monitor any interactions. So far, the resulting sequences have revealed a magpie, a robin, and some slugs taking a passing interest.
24hr FIELDCLUB Wildlife Museum - still from time-lapse series, 2006: This is not a museum displaying evidence of wildlife for the benefit of the human, but a museum displaying evidence of the human for the benefit of wildlife. This growing collection of dated and verified archeological artefacts were found during farming activities at FIELDCLUB. The collection is displayed 24/7 on-site, at the mercy of the elements, in an assortment of salvaged wine-chiller cabinets. The cabinets' 12volt LED lighting is activated automatically at night and recharged by solar power by day - allowing passing wildlife to view the displays at any time. A timelapse camera is occasionally set up to monitor any interactions. So far, the resulting sequences have revealed a magpie, a robin, and some slugs taking a passing interest.

Documentation - Transplanting trees grown from seed on-site
Documentation - Transplanting trees grown from seed on-site

Documentation - Preparing squash patches in spring
Documentation - Preparing squash patches in spring

Documentation - Machine for growing food
Documentation - Machine for growing food

Documentation - Piles of rotting mulch made from failed hay harvest
Documentation - Piles of rotting mulch made from failed hay harvest

Documentation - First experiments with hand sown barley
Documentation - First experiments with hand sown barley

Documentation - Rolling-in seed for green manure and goat forage crop
Documentation - Rolling-in seed for green manure and goat forage crop

Documentation - Preparing ground for overseeding clover pasture
Documentation - Preparing ground for overseeding clover pasture